PTSD Medication: Prazosin A Personal Journey

Prazosin is a hypertension medication that is also used for the treatment of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. Not every individual has the same response to medications, but if each person would take note of their experience then the overall view would be more accurate over time. I began using the medication in 2010. It had to be adjusted from 1mg to 2mg, but the flashbacks became less intense and less frequent. The dreams also were less intense and less frequent.

I noticed one of the side effects was that I became numb and rather emotionless inside. I felt dead and empty or numb. This was alarming to me but after 30 years of dealing with medications and therapy, I realized it maybe a side-effect that could be weathered out, so I continued taking the medication and monitoring the issues carefully. The benefits of a medication sometimes out way the side effects, thus waiting them out can be the best route of success if they are not serious. Side effects can last a few days to a few months until the body builds a tolerance. I had those feelings of numb, dead, empty, emotionlessness for 6 to 7 months before they finally subsided. My body had built a tolerance, yet the medication was working very well.  

One who is taking lasix , diuretics, (water pills) may want to be very careful when they take the Prazoson for often they both lower the blood pressure. Knowing this one should also know their medications for heart disease and be careful how they take these. Usually keeping a careful schedule not to mix them at the same time is all that is needed. As always every doctor one sees should have a detailed list of medications and medical information upgraded monthly. Below are relevant sights to help with the most up to date information.

Contact me for more information or any form or information or support needs.  

 

 

References:

http://www.webmd.com/anxiety-panic/prazosin-for-ptsd

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/760070

http://www.ihs.gov/nptc/documents/NPTCPrazosinPTSD-2-2012.pdf

http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/article.aspx?articleid=176041

Support Sites:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0001923/

http://www.ptsd.va.gov/

http://www.freedomfromfear.org/

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